Dear Esteemed Literary Agent

Dear Esteemed Literary Agent:

Vulnerability is an inexorable element of metamorphosis.  Mothers recognize it as they gestate, birth and raise their children; teens feel it as they face down adulthood; friends attempt to camouflage it as they navigate constantly shifting relationships with their peers. When vulnerability meets tragedy, an opening in the soul erupts and we are faced with the burden of transformation or stagnation.  A Heroic Survival, an Abysmal Truth: the Story of Dallon Whittaker dissects one such magnanimous journey through the eyes of the extraordinarily intuitive, seventeen-year-old Dallon (Dalli) Whittaker.

Set in present-day Pittsburgh three weeks after his mother, Nora, has died from an aggressive form of breast cancer, Dalli recalls the scenes and conversations between him and his mother which illuminated the previously concealed truth about his father’s distant fatal car accident—an accident that occurred prior to Dalli’s birth—and the ensuing dissipation of his paternal relatives.  Buttressed by his closest friends, Noah and Angelica, and his maternal uncle, Paul, Dalli guides the reader through his quest to make sense of his family’s jaded past and his newly orphaned status, all the while preparing for his matriculation to George Washington University.

An eccentric, Jewish psychologist, Nora is resurrected on the page, ultimately making this maternal-nerve-tapping story a piece of strong women’s fiction.  As Dalli contemplates his late mother’s quirky obsessions with etymology, bodies of water, and the scant form of preeminence she believed him to possess, the reader gains a sense of how deeply entrenched Nora is within certain confines of her son’s persona.  Meanwhile, the edgy, sarcastic, deeply loveable young man traverses the confines of grief, abandonment and unwanted responsibility, while unwittingly approximating self examination, resiliency and hope.  Ultimately, Dalli must choose whether or not he will lay to rest his own vulnerabilities, and those closely guarded by his mother.

Marketable to readers who savor the tangible characters and memorable storylines of Jodi Picoult and Amy Tan, this novel has been crafted fastidiously with filmic imagery, workshopped at Desert Nights Rising Stars 2009 Writer’s Conference, and critiqued by several fellow women’s literature writers.

After living in Pittsburgh for six years, I now live in Bozeman, Montana, where I continue to promote my memoir, A Dozen Invisible Pieces and Other Confessions of Motherhood (Cold Tree Press, 2008), raise three children, freelance for Montana Parent magazine and teach childbirth preparation classes.

Seeking a long-term agent-author partnership, I look forward to sending you the partial or complete manuscript of my book upon your request, and discussing other works I have in the wings which include strong female characters navigating familial and societal drama, and facing off against contemporary women’s issues.

Thank you for your time,

Kimmelin M Hull

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4 Comments

Filed under Artists, book promotion, Writing and Publishing

4 responses to “Dear Esteemed Literary Agent

  1. Shelly

    Good luck with the book. I am not as schooled on writing as you but there is something about the title that seems too verbose. Did you have any feedback on that from other writers?

  2. I like the changes to the closing, sounds much more like you- confident and professional.

    I’ll be keeping my fingers crossed.

  3. Beautiful letter. The plot synopsis is succinct and clear. But more, your command of language in this query letter is really impressive. It’ so hard to distill a complex novel into a cover letter and you’ve done it. Please keep me updated on what happens. I’m eager to hear any news.

  4. Thanks for the encouragement, ladies! Will definitely keep you posted. Now…onto more queries…

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