My Favorite Christmas Books for Children…

I have to admit, I’m kind of a Christmas freak. I mean, I start getting excited for Christmas on September 1. You see, I have a theory: any month ending in the three letters ber is a “Ber Month” and therefore, closely related to December…the king of all months! The Christmas month! Andrew loves to tease me about my Christmas zeal which, I am proud to say, is not driven by commercialism and the wreaths that go up outside our local shopping mall the day after Halloween.

For me, Christmas is a time of renewed hope, refurbished relationships, and a time to refocus our attentions on the things that really matter in life.

So, as a mother of three young children, reading story books about Christmas is a HUGE part of celebrating the advent season. It’s all a part of getting heart and mind ready for Christmas. So, here’s a short list of my favorite Christmas books for children:

The Littlest Christmas Tree (Janie Jasin)
The Velveteen Rabbit (Margery Williams, ill. Robyn Officer)
The Crippled Lamb (Max Lucado, ill. Liz Bonham)
Three Trees (Angela Elwell Hunt, Tim Jonke)
The Stable Where Jesus Was Born (Rhonda Gowler Greene, ill. Susan Gaber)
Snowman at Christmas (Caralyn Buehner, ill. Mark Buehner)
The Polar Express (Chris Van Allsburg)
and…of course...
The Night Before Christmas (Clement Moore, updated by Jan Brett)

Even if you’ve NEVER commented on this blog before, please, PLEASE, PLEASE consider adding your two cents in here: what are your favorite holiday books to share with children? There are so many out there and, quite frankly, my book shelves can only hold so many!!! But a virtual book shelf? Now, that has the potential to be endless! Please add to my virtual book shelf with your comment!
(Feel free to add as many of your favorites to the list as you like!)

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5 Comments

Filed under Writing and Publishing

5 responses to “My Favorite Christmas Books for Children…

  1. Kevin Colwell

    We have a book named “My Treasury of Christmas Stories” illustrated by Caroline Pedler. Though published in 2006, it seems to be out of print. This is the third year I’ve used it for bedtime stories in December.

    The book has retellings of Jesus’ birth, A Christmas Carol, The Nutcracker, The Little Fir Tree, and The Snow Queen, all in verse. It also has A Visit from St. Nicholas (aka The Night Before Christmas), but that is originally a poem and so is not changed.

    All except the Snow Queen and the Little Fir Tree are fairly well-known. Those two are tales by Hans Christian Andersen.

    The Snow Queen is not really a Christmas story; it is the story of a little girl named Gerda’s attempt to rescue her best friend, a boy named Kay, from the Snow Queen. It’s a cute story, and my daughters enjoy it.

    The Little Fir Tree is about a tree that grows up wishing it could be like the trees becoming ship’s masts until it learns about Christmas trees. It achieves its goal of being a Christmas tree only to learn it is only a two-day job. Fortunately, it gets planted a bit after New Year’s, living on to teach others not to grow up too quickly.

    The Elves and the Shoemaker is another good fairy tale with a Christmas setting.

  2. Kevin,

    Those are wonderful suggestions. Thank you so much for adding to the list!

  3. I still think one of the best gifts children can get at Christmas are books. Thanks for reviewing these. they sound like a great addition to any child’s library.

  4. My pleasure. Feel free to add some of your own ideas to the list.

  5. One book you might want to add is a Christmas book that has newly been published. It is called “Caleb & Shalev” http://www.eloquentbooks.com/Caleb&Shalev.html.

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